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Faculty Research

Unparalleled research projects led by faculty

Our world-renowned faculty members in the School of International Letters and Cultures solve prominent issues facing communities worldwide through research. From exploring the meaning of butterflies in Chinese and Korean culture to addressing the effect of interpersonal violence in Latin America, our faculty-led research projects have unprecedented value for cultures and communities across the globe.

Joanne Tsao
Senior Lecturer, Chinese

Changing representation

Textural memory

Urban space in pre-modern literature

Materials and objects in pre-modern literature

 

 

Anne Walton-Ramirez
Lecturer Sr, MY, Spanish

second language acquisition, bilingual child language acquisition, syntax, translation

Bradley Wilson
Senior Lecturer, Japanese

Japanese pedagogy, gaming in education, Onmyodo, Japanese folklore, Japanese calligraphy

Paul Arena
Lecturer, Classics
Omar Beas
Lecturer, Spanish

Professor Beas is interested in in linguistic typology and in the formal and generative approach to language. His work has mainly focused on the structure of the clause and the syntax of preverbal lexical subjects in Spanish. He is currently working on the description of the syntactic changes in the verbal phrase in the history of Spanish as... more

Sarah Bolmarcich
Lecturer, MY, Classics
  • ancient Greek and Roman international relations and diplomacy
  • ancient Greek and Roman history and historiography
  • Greek and Roman epigraphy

 

Hannah Cheloha
Lecturer, ASL
Dulce Estevez
Lecturer, Spanish

Her recent research centers on migration patterns, transnational communities, ethnicity and communication and, historical recurrence of sociological patterns in Latin American literature. She is currently developing curriculum for courses on Caribbean culture, Spanish for specific purposes, and Mexican culture. 

Kumiko Hirano Gahan
Lecturer, Japanese
Pamela Howard
Lecturer, MY, ASL

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Global Intersections Blog

the SILC Instructional and Research Technology Committee has created a central hub of research and points-of-interest stories surrounding the language and cultures in the School of International Letters and Cultures.  This is a constant work in progress-- there is something new to look at every time.  These entries come from the perspective of faculty, graduate students, lecturers, and instructors. If you are interested in intensive courses, faculty research, or the role of technology in learning languages, give the link a quick click

http://silcintersections.blogspot.com/